Today marks the 45th anniversary of Apollo 11’s landing on the moon. Click the photo above for more.

Previously on L.A. Times Past:

Front page: Walk on Moon!

That’s one small word to argue over

Photo: A closeup of an astronaut’s bootprint in the lunar soil, July 20, 1969. Credit: NASA

"When Hunter Thompson wrote his book on the Hell’s Angels a few years ago, I assigned a sturdy countercultural writer to talk with him for an hour. Four days later, the writer returned with incoherent tales of bizarre scenes with Bennett Cerf’s old friends in the Continental Hotel dining room, weird visits to strip shows and a nonstop drug trip through Los Angeles. It should have been a book, I thought. And now, here it is…or something very like it," Digby Diehl wrote in The Times in 1972, by way of introducing Thompson’s most famous work, “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.”

Thompson was born 77 years ago today. He’s shown above, at left, with then-candidate George McGovern during the 1972 presidential campaign, which Thompson chronicled in his “Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ‘72.”

In observance of his birthday, our Books section is recommending the three works mentioned here, plus his obituary for Richard Nixon, as essential Thompson reads.

Upon Thompson’s death in 2005, McGovern wrote a remembrance that concluded with these lines:

Hunter was disheartened after the [1972] campaign, and it fell to me on several occasions to try to persuade him not to give up on what he called “this f——- up country.”

What I didn’t get to tell him was that one of the reasons we should never give up on America is that from time to time, as we have been reminded recently, this country produces a genuine original — a Katharine Hepburn, a Ray Charles, an Arthur Miller, a Johnny Carson, an Ossie Davis, a professor Seymour Melman, or an inaccurate and irreverent and truthful Hunter Thompson.

— Lindsay Barnett

Photo: Los Angeles Times

Q

Anonymous asked:

I met Robert Kennedy and John Glenn at Disneyland the day before the California Primary in 1968. Do you have any photos? Thank you very much.

A

I don’t see any photos or archival coverage of that event, but I did find a photograph, published June 3, 1968, of Robert Kennedy at Bolsa Grande High School in Garden Grove.

image

Matt Ballinger

Previously on L.A. Times Past:

Robert F. Kennedy shot in Los Angeles

Q

Anonymous asked:

How do I locate a picture from the archives of the late 60's?

A

To request a reprint of anything from The Times’ archive — including articles, photos and commemorative pages — start here: How to obtain Rights and Permissions to use Los Angeles Times content

If you’d like to search The Times’ archive, go here: Los Angeles Times archive search

Babe Ruth made his big league debut 100 years ago Friday. The Times’ Chris Dufresne:

It is easy now to identify the most famous name from the baseball box score dated July 11, 1914.

However, one hundred summers ago at Boston’s Fenway Park, the annotation “Ruth” was not historically significant.

The baby-faced pitcher, only months out of reform school, must have been crippled with nerves in his major league debut.

The star power that afternoon belonged to Red Sox outfielder Tris Speaker and a Cleveland Naps lineup led by “Shoeless” Joe Jackson and Nap Lajoie.

Ray Chapman, the Cleveland shortstop, batting sixth, was killed six years later when he was struck by a Carl Mays fastball at New York’s Polo Grounds.

The baptism of George Herman “Babe” Ruth, Boston’s rookie lefty, was efficient but ordinary. He scattered eight hits in Boston’s 4-3 triumph, helped at the end by two shutout innings from Dutch Leonard.

Cleveland left fielder Jack Graney, the first batter Ruth ever faced, singled. Ruth, in his first major league at-bat, struck out. He was later pinch-hit for (imagine that) by Duffy Lewis, a career .284 hitter.

Nothing on that day hinted at immortality, or the notion that a century later we’d still be talking about Ruth as perhaps the most iconic figure in sports history.

Twenty-one years after his debut, on May 30, 1935, a worn-out Ruth, wearing the alien clothes of the Boston Braves, struck out in his final plate appearance at Philadelphia’s Baker Bowl.

Between those monumental bookend whiffs he whipped up quite a dust storm.

Read more: 100 years after big league debut, Babe Ruth is still larger than life

Above is a clipping from a report on a 1924 exhibition game played in Orange County. The Times called the game, played at the Brea Bowl, “probably the greatest de luxe sand lot game Southern California has ever seen.”

[Fans wanting to see home runs] certainly were not disappointed, for the mighty Babe twice hammered the ball so far that souvenir-hunting youngsters were still pursuing it at a late hour last night.

Click the image above to read the full report from 1924.

Matt Ballinger

Q

dlh3humboldt asked:

I'm looking for a copy of an article in the LA Times, "The Good Life", Sports, Part III, Tuesday, 5/5/1973. Is there a way to get a copy? Also is there any way to find out where the picture was taken?

A

It seems you’re mostly interested in the pictures — the article, if you can call it that, is awfully short. Sadly, I wasn’t able to find high-quality images. What I do have is the PDF of the May 15, 1973, page on which the photos ran. The locations are Lake Havasu (golfing), Bishop Creek (fishing) and Long Beach (sailing).

image

To request a reprint of anything from The Times’ archive — including articles, photos and commemorative pages — start here: How to obtain Rights and Permissions to use Los Angeles Times content

If you’d like to search The Times’ archive, go here: Los Angeles Times archive search

Thanks for reading.

Matt Ballinger

Q

Anonymous asked:

I was trying to get a copy of the front page of the August 14, 1964 LA Times. My brother in law turns 50 next month & was hoping to get my hands on a copy. Please let me know the status of this request. Thanks, Marc

A

Hello, Marc. Here’s a digital copy of the front page from the Final edition of The Times on Aug. 14, 1964.

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L.A. Times Past gets lots of questions like this one.

To request a reprint of anything from The Times’ archive — including articles, photos and commemorative pages — start here: How to obtain Rights and Permissions to use Los Angeles Times content

If you’d like to search The Times’ archive, go here: Los Angeles Times archive search

And thanks for reading.

Matt Ballinger

"Seinfeld" premiered 25 years ago last week. The show didn’t begin its regular run until the next year, and that’s when The Times’ Howard Rosenberg reviewed it.

NBC’s new comedy “Seinfeld” blows up a gale of wit and freshness.

This is just the kind of amusingly off-center comedy now missing from NBC’s lineup, one of those rare, delightful meshings of concept, cast and execution, with producer Tom Cherones providing inspired direction. Nothing is forced.

Read the whole review here: It’s Jerry Seinfeld’s Show — and It’s a Winner

Matt Ballinger

Original published caption, Jan. 29, 1995: KICKING BACK: Jerry Seinfeld, left, and Michael Richards, who plays Kramer, take advantage of the set on their television show to rest during a break in rehearsal. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

For the Fourth of July, some patriotic reading. Click the headline stack above to read a collection of Independence Day writings, including one by Frederick Douglass. They were published in The Times on July 1, 1894.

Douglass’ is titled “True to Our Constitution”:

In politics, morals and religion, and in all things desirable, truth must be the basis of effort and object. The rails must be true to the level and to each other, for safety and speed. The sides of the ship must be true, in order to stand evenly upon her keel. The wall must be vertically true, or it will come down with a crash. Our government must be true to its Constitution and its professions, or it will not stand. It professes six objects, not more than one of which has been thus far obtained. Neither “Union,” “Tranquility,” “Defense,” “Justice,” “Welfare,” nor “Liberty” has been truthfully sought or attained by it. For union, we have antagonism; for tranquility, agitation; for the citizen’s defense, we have been relegated to the States; for justice, we have had race discrimination; for liberty, we have had slavery, and for general welfare, we have had sectional favoritism.

What is now needed is simple truth, all honest conformity by the government to the Constitution of the United States, a conscientious discharge of duties of the Christian religion, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. If there shall be moral stamina enough in us for this, we need have no fear of any harm from within or from without, now or hereafter, for salvation is itself based upon truth.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Also included in the document linked to in this post is an excerpt, published in The Times on July 4, 1971, of Frederick Douglass’ famous Fourth of July speech (“What, to the American slave is your Fourth of July?” 1852).

For more Fourth of July reading, The Times’ Noah Remnick compiled excerpts of notable Independence Day speeches, from Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Susan B. Anthony, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Ronald Reagan, and others. Heard on the Fourth of July — from Frederick Douglass to Ronald Reagan